Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber
Photo By Lance Gerber

NOW YOU SEE ME, NOW YOU DON’T


          Now You See Me, Now You Don’t, are the words that a humble puddle in the desert of Saudi Arabia would say to any of her curious visitors. She knows that she is only here for a brief moment of time; where she is formed is really by accident and will not be her permanent home, therefore an encounter with a puddle can carry folds of information and a range of ideas that can disappear in a moment. If only we can really see her.



There is no randomness to the puddle forming; reading a puddle and the circumstances of its appearance is a skill that is simple yet constantly overlooked. Puddles are concentrations of water that are caught in nonporous environments. The typical puddle forms when water is traveling downwards, allowing gravity to guide its path to the lowest point in the land, until something stops it. In nature it could be a rock or a patch of saturated wetland. Puddles in forests or valleys tend to survive and grow or they just fade away in dryer environments like the deserts of AlUla.



In urban spaces puddles have a bad reputation; the puddle is not an innocent natural phenomenon. In cities, puddles are usually seen as a sign of an imperfection in design, or a failure in engineering. Puddles are to be eradicated and avoided in most human inhabited spaces.



I present in this temporary installation, a set of puddle like installations, that will last for a few months, they do not belong to this landscape and yet they have decided to stop and exist in the crevasses of the AlUla landscape. The puddles are not real and are actually made of a huge trampolines that can be touched, laid on, Jumped on and observed. In the evening they become Moon Circles through a series of lighting techniques used to create this effect. They are activated by people interacting with them, and through the body and this experience we may reflect on the environment this artwork has been placed in.



Climate change and irresponsible man made irrigation practices has made water scarcity one of the most important issues facing my country today. These puddles are indicators of the impending water crisis and the disappearance of these puddles is what I want to examine in this artwork, conceptually speaking I am using this artwork to underline the impact of absence and the politics of visibility.


Produced in 2020 - Unique Piece - Medium: 12 Trampolines and lights Comissioned by Desert X and The Royal Comission of Al-Ula